Andy Smith (programmer)

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on September 12 2017. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Andy_Smith_(programmer). All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Andy_Smith_(programmer), the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Andy_Smith_(programmer). Purge

Andrew Michael (Andy) Smith (born July 31, 1984 in San Jose), known on the internet as “Termie,” is an American computer programmer and a notable contributor to the open-source software movement. Smith is Co-Founder of OpenStack,[1][2] Co-Author of OAuth 1.0,[3][4] and Co-Founder of BarCamp.[5][6][7] Also of note are Smith’s contributions to the development of the social web in his roles as an early engineer of the social web browser, Flock,[8] and of the microblogging platform, Jaiku.[9]

Smith's commitment to projects that encourage and facilitate building community around open collaboration and knowledge-sharing is captured in his statement:

"I believe knowledge should be in the hands of the people, because only through an intelligent public can we implement intelligent change."[10]

OpenStack evolved from the Nova project that Smith worked on while contracting for NASA.[11][12] OpenStack software controls large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources throughout a datacenter, managed through a dashboard.[13] As of 2017, OpenStack has over 80,000 community members and over 600 supporting companies.[14] As Co-Author of the original OAuth software, Smith co-created the mechanism that is used by companies such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter to permit their users to share information about their accounts with third party applications or websites.[15][16][17][18][19][20] Smith co-created the original BarCamp - the first inclusive, open-access unconference.[21][22][23] The event took place in Palo Alto, California,[24] and evolved into the now global unconference movement, which, since its inception in 2005, has spread to 350 cities around the world.[25]

Career[edit | hide all | hide | edit source]

Smith worked at Sxip Networks from 2004 to 2005, where he wrote the open source SDKs for Sxip's internet identity and single sign-on solutions. His ideas and work were later subsumed into OpenID 2.0.[26][27] He then joined social web browser RoundTwo[28], later renamed Flock, where he wrote the browser’s Mac support, the photo uploader and photo browser and wrote the social bookmarking integration. [29]

He is now Chief Technology Officer of Wercker, which was acquired by Oracle on April 17, 2017.[30]

Speaking[edit | hide | edit source]

Smith's conference and meet-up talks, addressing programmers and typically sharing learnings and insights on programming execution and operations, are characterized by their performative style.[31]

Side projects[edit | hide | edit source]

In 2005, in Palo Alto, California, Smith co-created the first BarCamp with Tantek Çelik, Chris Messina, Matt Mullenweg, Ryan King and Eris Stassi.[32][33][34][35][36] Çelik's original concept for BarCamp was that of a non-exclusive, "open" alternative to Foo Camp.[37] In Smith's original announcement of the event, he describes it as

"an open, welcoming, once-a-year event for geeks to camp out for a couple days with wifi and smash their brains together. It’s about love and geekery and having a focal point for great ideas, like SHDH more in-tents (GET IT?!), like FOO but open."[38]

Since its inception, BarCamp has been held in over 350 cities across North America, South America, Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Australasia and Asia.[39] The largest recorded BarCamp took place in January 2013 with over 6400 confirmed registered attendees in YangonMyanmar(Burma).[40][41] BarCamp's codified and freely available organizational process has been used as the model for user-generated conferences in other fields, such as EdCamp,[42] IndieWebCamp,[43] WordCamp.[44]

References[edit | hide | edit source]

  1. "OpenStack Founding Engineers From NASA and Rackspace Join Nebula". Reuters. 2012-09-19. Retrieved 2017-09-13.
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  6. Arrington, Michael. "Event – Bar Camp (Day 2)". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-15. no-break space character in |title= at position 22 (help)
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  8. Arrington, Michael. "Flock – Social Browsing is Cool". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-13. no-break space character in |title= at position 27 (help)
  9. Smith, Andy. "Making It Better". Retrieved 2017-09-13.
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  11. "NASA Embraces Amazon Cloud, Leaves OpenStack Behind". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  12. "OpenStack Founding Engineers From NASA and Rackspace Join Nebula". Reuters. 2012-09-19. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
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  15. "Gmail Now More Secure With OAuth Support". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  16. Siegler, MG. "OAuthpocalypse Tomorrow: Twitter Ending Basic Auth Support At 8 AM PT". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-15. no-break space character in |title= at position 67 (help)
  17. Consult, Oliver Pfaff, iC. "When the Answer is OAuth, What Was the Question?". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  18. Grimes, Roger A. "What is OAuth? What security pros need to know". CSO Online. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  19. Wilhelm, Alex (2010-04-21). "Facebook: What They Announced At F8". The Next Web. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
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  23. Arrington, Michael. "Event – Bar Camp (Day 2)". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-15. no-break space character in |title= at position 22 (help)
  24. "Barring None, Geek Camp Rocks". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
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  27. McCarty, Brad (2010-11-04). "Facebook Connect, OAuth and OpenID: The differences and the future". The Next Web. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
  28. Arrington, Michael. "Flock – Social Browsing is Cool". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-13. no-break space character in |title= at position 27 (help)
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  34. Arrington, Michael. "Event – Bar Camp (Day 2)". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2017-09-13. no-break space character in |title= at position 22 (help)
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  36. "Bar camp buzz builds; the story twists, turns, shouts!". Factory Joe. 2005-08-18. Retrieved 2017-09-14.
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  40. "Yangon's digital spring". The Economist. 2012-03-03. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved 2017-09-15.
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